MANUAL for
ARMY and NAVY
BAKERS and COOKS
1917

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Baking Powder Bread:

12 cups flour = 9 lbs.
6 heaping spoons Baking Powder = 8 oz
2 spoons Salt = 1 1/2 oz.
4 spoons Lard = 4 oz..
6 cups Milk = 4 1/2 qt.
.

Sift baking powder and flour together, make bay, put in milk, salt and lard melted; scale 18 one pound pieces; make into loaves, pan, put in hot oven, bake about 30 minutes.

 

Potato Soup:

18 large potatoes sliced and boiled in enough water to cover, season with salt and pepper, a little butter and 1 cup of sweet cream or milk.

 

Bean Soup:

Eight cups water, and use 2 smoked ham bones or bacon, 2 cups beans when cooked add two spoons flour and 3 eggs, stirred together and stir into the soup.

 

Vegetable Soup:

Scrape 6 carrots, 3 onions, 3/4 head of cabbage and 6 turnips, chopped fine; boil 1 hour with water enough to cover and 3 spoons butter; prepare 6 large potatoes the same way. Take some meat stock (with all the grease taken off); boil all together 1/2 hour, season to taste.

 

Onion Soup:

Six large onions, slice and stew with 4 cups water, season with salt, pepper and butter; serve with crackers same as oysters.

 

Meats:

There are two general principles governing the cooking of meats, which are:

1st. All roasts should be placed in a very hot oven, and some cooks prefer to sear them in a hot griddle before placing them in the oven.  The outside surfaces become slightly solidified, thus retaining all the rich juices. Similarly the outside surfaces of steaks should be seared for same reason.

2nd. All meats for soups or stews in which all or part of the juices are required separated, should be placed in cold water, and allowed to come to a boil. This permits of the extraction of the juices, as the outside surfaces are kept soft.

 

Roast Beef:

After the roast has been well basted with butter or suet, put it in a well-heated oven to brown it over, thus keeping the juice inside, after this, it may cook more slowly.

When about half done, season with salt and pepper and dredge with flour; baste frequently. A roast of from 4 to 6 pounds will require an hour and one-half to be properly done and leave it a little rare inside.

 

Omelet:

Twelve eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, 6 spoons milk, 1 spoon cornstarch or flour dissolved in milk, season with salt and pepper; turn into buttered frying pan. When browned on the underside place a plate over the pan turn the omelet out and fold.

 

Eggs a la Suisse:

Take a shallow baking dish and put two large spoons of butter in a little bit of milk, then layer of grated cheese, break a number of eggs carefully and put them in the dish, being careful to keep them separate, season with salt and pepper, sprinkle cheese on top, put in the oven and as soon as the cheese is brown, serve.

 

Salad Dressing:

9 eggs
1 spoon flour
1/2 spoon mustard
1/2 spoon salt
1/2 spoon celery seed
1/4 cup sugar
3 spoons butter, melted
1/2 cup very mild white vinegar

Beat eggs very light, add sugar and other dry ingredients, then melted butter, pour this mixture into vinegar which must be at the boiling point. Stir until thick. Put into sealed jar and thin be adding cream.

 

Potato Salad:

Slice and cut in pieces 4 cups of cold boiled potatoes, 3 small onions and 9 hard boiled eggs. Season to taste. Mix together. Use for dressing 1 cup of vinegar sweetened to taste, 1 spoon of mustard, 3 lumps of butter the size of an egg, 3 spoons of cream.

Let this come to the boiling point, and pour over the ingredients; after stirring well garnish with slices of hard boiled eggs.

 

Chicken Salad:

Boil the chicken until it is tender and chop in small pieces, chop also the whites of a dozen hard boiled eggs; add chopped cabbage and celery in equal quantities, pound the yolks of the eggs fine and add spoons of sugar and butter, one teaspoon of mustard with pepper and salt to taste. Finally, add 1-6 cup of good vinegar. Mix thoroughly,

NOTE. Veal boiled tender may be used instead of all chicken meat.

 

Hints and Helps.

Meat. - Tough meat may be made tender by laying it a few minutes in vinegar water.

Milk. - Before boiling milk rinse out the saucepan with a little hot water; it will prevent the milk sticking to the bottom of the pan. A pinch of soda stirred into milk that is to be boiled, will keep it from curdling.

Bacon rinds can be used many ways, so do not throw them in the garbage barrel. Wash them thoroughly and put them in a jar for future use. They make an excellent seasoning for greens and some soups, and they are often used to give a finishing touch to baked and fricasseed chicken.

You will find that a half-worn whisk broom makes a good scrubbing brush for enameled ware. When your whisk brooms become worn take them and trim them to a stub. Then scald with soapy water, then with clear water and finally rinse with cold water.

 

Now you can cook for any hungry Doughboy!

 

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Extracts from: Manual for Army and Navy Bakers and Cooks, 1917, Ernest George Prior (2nd Illinois Artillery) and Thomas J. Bryan (D.Sc., Ph.D.), distributed by Calumet Baking Powder Co., Chicago, 1917.

This title is part of the contents in the America in France 1917-1919 Cdrom book. You can order this title on our Store.

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